Install Window Weather Stripping

The focus of this article is to show you how to install window weather stripping. With winter just around the corner, you may need to spend some time prepping your windows for the pending cold weather. Of course, we believe you should upgrade your windows to modern, energy efficiency windows and avoid all this nonsense. But if new, replacement windows are not in your budget just yet, the tips below may get you through one more winter season.

Quick Tips on How to Install Window Weather Stripping

Exterior Caulking: Inspect the condition of the existing caulking on the exterior of your windows. Look for gaps between the window trim and the siding of your home and replace or re-caulk the window as needed.

Interior Caulking: Move to the inside of your home and look for gaps between the interior trim and the drywall. Use a paintable caulk to fill the gaps and create a tight seal.

Install Storm Windows: Take advantage of the last few weeks of fair weather and install your storm windows now. If your storm windows remain in place year-round, this is a good time to close the lower sash. Look for gaps in the storm windows and apply a foam, weather-tight seal.

Replace the Upper Sash Seal: Lower the upper sash and inspect the top seal. If the sash is equipped with metal weather stripping, you may be able to re-spring the seal by bending it upwards to create a tight seal. If the metal weather stripping is bent or crushed beyond repair, its time for a replacement.

Replace the Lower Sash Seal: Raise the lower sash and inspect the bottom weather stripping for damage. Just like we did on the upper sash weather stripping, you may be able to bend it back into shape. Otherwise, replace the seal with a new metal strip from the hardware store.

If you discover that the strip is missing completely, or if the windows were never equipped with a seal in the first place, you can improvise by purchasing and installing a foam seal or an EPM Rubber Bubble Seal. A quality rubber seal will last for years, while the foam may only last 2 or 3 years before you need to replace it. Make sure the window will fully close and latch properly before installing the new bubble seal on the remainder windows in your home.

Temporary Fix: If you live in an older home with old, loose fitting window sashes, you can implement a temporary fix. Install rope seal around the entire perimeter of the window on the inside of your home. The rope seal can easily be pulled off the windows when spring rolls around, so you can enjoy the fresh air. Alternatively, you can use a product called “Zip-A-Way” which is applied just like regular caulking, but it easily peels off the windows the following spring. Unlike the rope seal, “Zip-A-Way” creates an aesthetically pleasing bead that won’t be noticeable by visitors.

Check out this Video on How to Install Window Weather Stripping

Special thanks to the folks at Columbia Power Partners!

“Taking the time to properly install window weather stripping can lower your monthly utility bill by as much as 15%”

While the video may offer some temporary tips on how to install window weather stripping, you should consider a more permanent fix. Contact the Window Repair Guy for pricing on replacement windows.

Need professional help to install window weather stripping on your windows? Contact our support team at (815)-634-8922.

Sealing Air Leaks

You may think that August is too soon to begin thinking about sealing air leaks in your home. But for me, I would rather do the outdoor work during the fair-weather months. Not a big fan of the cold! Not to mention, that you will have difficulty sealing air leaks using caulking if the temperature is below 45 degrees Fahrenheit. This is the minimum recommended temperature for applying caulking, as set forth by the department of energy and most caulking manufacturers. You should also pay attention to the weather forecast and avoid applying caulking if there is a chance of rain or snow later in the day. You need to allow 24 hours for caulking to fully cure. Read more

Spring Home Inspection Checklist

Now that the weather has finally turned the corner, we thought it would be a good time to share our spring home inspection checklist. It seemed like winter would never end, but spring has finally sprung. If you are like most home owners, you hunkered down for winter and have totally ignored the exterior of your home. After all, its much cozier inside by the fireplace, rather than trying to climb a ladder outside in the cold, wearing boots, mitts, and a parka. But that’s all behind us now, so you can head outside to enjoy the fresh air and take along our spring home inspection checklist. Read more

Window sill dry rot is a common problem on older homes. This is especially true if the home in question was poorly maintained. If the home owner neglected peeling paint or cracks in the caulking, window sill dry rot is inevitable. Once the wood is damaged, its too late for a fresh coat of paint. You will need to dig deeper and remove the dry rot. I found this handy video that demonstrates the easy steps required to remove window sill dry rot like a pro. Read more

Sticky Sliding Door

In this article we will take a look at a few steps you can take to fix a sticky sliding door. While sliding patio doors are a convenient way to access your outdoor living area, a sticky sliding door can be a nuisance. While there are various nuances for specific brands, I found this video on how to repair an Anderson Sliding Patio Door. Your sliding door may be a different brand, but the basic premise is the same. Remove it, clean it, fix it, lube it, and adjust it! Read more

Cleaning Window Tracks

Cleaning window tracks and sliding patio doors can be a nasty job that takes a lot of elbow grease. If your windows or sliding doors have been ignored for a few seasons it may be time to do a little maintenance. While I hate the thought of cleaning window tracks myself, I have discovered a little-known trick than can turn this tedious task into something that is quick and easy. No scrubbing required! I like the sound of that. Read more

window warning signs

If you pay attention to a few basic window warning signs, you may just avoid some costly repairs. A quick monthly inspection may reveal issues with your existing windows. Let’s examine some of the more common window warning signs and just exactly what your windows are trying to tell you. If only they could speak! Read more

Opening Stuck Windows

Opening stuck windows in older homes can be quite a challenge. It is relatively common to find windows in historic homes that have been painted shut. The culprit is usually a lazy painter, or in the case of a recent Victorian Home restoration project, numerous painters who painted multiple coats of paint over the windows over time. This is the worst-case scenario, at best the windows of historic homes are simply stuck from lack of use. In either case, you can follow these five easy steps for opening stuck windows and letting the fresh air in. Read more

Removing Lead Paint

Extreme care must be taken when removing lead paint on older windows. Lead paint, which may be found in homes constructed prior to 1978, can lead to serious health problems. This is particularly true for children under the age of 6 who are exposed to lead. The source of the danger comes from flaking or chalking lead paint. The risk of exposure is amplified when sanding old windows during a remodeling project. Read more

Window Maintenance Checklist

Our Window Maintenance Checklist includes the vital steps to ensure the ongoing durability and functionality of your home windows. You may not realize it, but the windows in your home represent a large portion of your investment. Following our window maintenance checklist at least once a year can protect this investment and preserve the value of your property. Taking the proper steps to protect your windows and their frames will undoubtedly extend their lifespan. Read more